Slideshow Image
   
   

Installation view

Slideshow Image
   
   

Installation view

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

royal wedding,2012
Oil on canvas, artist's frame
40.5 x 30.5 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

interim, 2012
Oil on linen, artist's frame
40.5 x 30.5 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

I want to be your vacuum cleaner, 2012
Oil on cotton, wooden frame
40.5 x 30.5 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

imperfect lover, 2012
Oil on paint tube
14 x 10 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

egalitarianism, 2012
Oil on foam
181 x 43 x 43 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

egalitarianism, 2012 (detail)
Oil on foam
181 x 43 x 43 cm

Slideshow Image
   
   
Guy Rusha

we are young, 2012
Oil on canvas
44.5 x 35 cm

SHE LOOKS NICE

Guy Rusha

Private View: Thursday 4th October 6 – 9 pm

The Sunday Painter is pleased to announce the opening of SHE LOOKS NICE, a solo presentation of new works by London based artist Guy Rusha.

To Accompany the exhibition the artists has produced a unique limited edition artwork, ‘Olympic Poster’, 2012 which can be viewed here.

Guy Rusha mostly makes paintings but also makes sculptures. The paintings tend to be of women. They are painted quite thick but the final images themselves are sparse. In terms of detail, the faces are usually extremely simple, almost verging on being blank, except for a couple of specifically telling features. These might be a piece of jewelry such as a gold earring or a stroke of neon eyeshadow. These details are homed in on, exaggerated slightly in scale and colour. As such, they seem to say more about the person looking than the subject being painted. His sculptures tend to sit more in the realm of found materials. Recently he has been using sponge. These started life as a quick response to Yves Klein. Carved into sharply angular, slightly figurative forms and steeped in black oil paint, they appear to masquerade as classical sculpture. There is something flip about them, irreverent perhaps. They take on the look of classical sculpture as seen in black and white photographs in art books but without all the labour. They are indeed physically extremely light.

In terms of his approach and subject matter both his painting and sculpture refer to a specific tradition in art that involves institutions, museums, the idea of great works and their weightiness. He has said in the past that his decision to paint women enables him to converse with this tradition from his position as young artist looking at what his predecessors called art. But there is usually something slightly odd about the actual look of his painting and sculpture that prevents it from sitting comfortably within the realm of nostalgia or classicism.  They are full of hard edges and too sharp angles. They have a distinct minimalism, something that looks unburdened or even newborn. Collectively they share resemblances, becoming slightly generic looking as if painted from the same vague memory. They seem always a little out of reach. I would say that there is an anachronism about them but it’s one that doesn’t refer strictly to the past.

-Gili Tal 2012

Guy Rusha – b. 1983 in London where he lives and works. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art and the British School at Athens. Recent solo shows include Her, Horton Gallery, New York 2011, Greek Works, British School at Athens 2010 and Practical Treatises, The Hex, London 2008. Recent group shows include A Momentary Stay Against Confusion, Horton Gallery, Berlin 2011, A Painting Show curated by Aaron Moulton, Autocentre, Berlin 2011, and Middlemarch, Autoitalia, London 2010.